barretoart:

Experiemental photography 
Painting with the light of the moon
.



afro-dominicano:

blipsterinsverige:

jaded-sage:

skindeeptales:

1. Do your research when choosing a tattoo and an artist.

  • Don’t rush yourself when choosing an idea. You’re going to have to live with it forever.
  • Most artists have a speciality, think about this when choosing  one. If you want a photorealistic tattoo don’t choose an artist who specializes in American Traditional, for example.
  • Don’t ask to have your neck/face/hands tattooed if it’s your first tattoo, you will most likely be denied.
  • Look into the cost of the tattoo before walking into the shop, don’t sacrifice the tattoo you want to get a good deal. Save up to get the right ink.
  • Be prepared to be placed on a large wait list for the more popular artists.

2. Prepare properly on the day you get your tattoo.

  • Eat a full meal beforehand.
  • Many artists recommend drinking orange juice prior to getting inked.
  • Don’t drink alcohol beforehand.
  • Getting tattooed is a pretty intimate experience, don’t forget to shower.

3. Bring a good reference photo.

  • Bring in a high res photo if possible; at the very least a picture that is big and not blurry.

4. Don’t bring your entourage to the shop with you.

  • It’s fine to bring a friend to hold your hand, any more than one is rude and obnoxious.
  • Children are not permitted in most tattoo shops, leave them at home.

5. Trust your artist. 

  • The artist knows what they are doing, there is no need to be a “backseat driver.”

6. Check out the stencil design, body placement, and spelling before the tattoo begins.

via Inked Magazine

Inked Magazine

  • If you see something, say something. You aren’t going to hurt anyone’s feelings if you tell them that something is spelled incorrectly.

7. Be prepared to go through some pain, tattoos hurt.

  • Don’t be afraid to tell your artist that you need to take a break if the pain is too much. Nobody wants a passed out client.
  • Ribs, feet, hands, head, and the spine all really hurt.

8. Stay still!

  • We know that it might be difficult to do so, but make every effort to remain as calm and still as possible while getting tattooed. If you are jittery the artist won’t be able to create straight lines.

9. Tip your artist.

  • Most artists don’t own their shops and have to pay a percentage of the tattoo price to the shop.
  • Tipping anywhere between 10-20% should be fine.
  • If you really love the work don’t be afraid of tipping extra.

10. Take care of your tattoo once you leave the shop.

  • Tattoo aftercare is a crucial step in assuring you have a good tattoo.
  • Tattoos will scab and they should heal in 2-3 weeks.
  • Avoid sun and going in bodies of water for the first 2 weeks.
  • Keep the tattoo moist and clean as it heals.
  • Once it’s healed don’t forget to use SPF 50 sunscreen when going outside, you don’t want your tattoo to fade.

via Inked Magazine

 

For future reference!

I think it’s time for tattoo number 22, 23 and 24

These are all so on point!

edens-blog:

wkdart:

iamtonysexual:

andrejpejicjimmyvegafanfic:

onlylolgifs:

 People blown over in streets as Storm Ivar hits Norway

looks fun

makin’ my way dOWNTO—-

ASDFK

MAKIN’ MY WAY UPTOWN

not gonna lie at first I thought these people were really good at the Smooth Criminal lean

step 1. buy several hundred bags of miniature marshmallows 

step 2. somehow get upwind

step 3. open the bags and let the sugary puffs fly free

step 4. enjoy the sight of people getting absolutely pelted with marshmallows 

step 5. ?????????

step 6. profit 

numbingeuphoria:

superiorescalator:

please watch this vine

Why is that mini corndog barking?

We all love someone way too fucking much.
(via eiffeled)

idontevenknowokay:

umyeahhiimdave:

strangeparking:

can you imagine one day logging in and

image

i wouldnt know what to do

"shit did i post an opinion"

serenadestrong:

theroguefeminist:

insect-ligaments:

thestoutorialist:

maliceandvice:

calantheandthenightingale:

mydollyaviana:

Disney vs. 7 early fairytales 

The 1812 version of Snow White is even worse when you consider that the girl was only seven years old in the tale (plus her unconscious body ended up being carted around by the prince until one of his servants accidentally woke her up).  Also, in The Little Mermaid, the mermaid’s unable to speak because she had her tongue cut out >__<

But I’d love to see faithful adaptations of the original tales.  Especially Bluebeard.  We need a Bluebeard adaptation.

Actually, the original-original pre-Grimm Brothers’ stories that were passed around Europe via oral tradition are nowhere near as violent as the Grimm’s made them. Cinderella’s stepsisters were never ugly and kept their eyes, Snow White’s mother was not even a villain (instead a group of bandits were), and instead of spending the whole story napping Sleeping Beauty outwitted a dangerous bandit leader, wouldn’t let him sleep with her, and saved herself. 

The original oral stories were radically changed by the Brothers Grimm to fit their personal and political beliefs. Most notably, they often added in female characters solely for the purpose of making them evil villains and took away most of the heroines’ agency and intelligence. Both brothers belonged to a small fanatical sect of Catholicism that vilified women because of the idea of Original Sin and Wilhelm in particular had a particularly deep hatred of women. The Grimms were actually pretty horrible people. Those cannibalistic queens and ugly stepsisters and the mass amount of violence against women didn’t exist until the Grimms wanted them to. Their ideas stuck so soundly though that we now assume they were in the original tales and that these terrible characters and ideas come out of some perceived barbaric Old World culture. But in truth they’re really the Grimms’ weird obsession with hating women showing through. The original oral folklore focused on the heroes’ and heroines’ good deeds and used them as ways to teach cultural norms and a society’s rules and encouraged girls to be quick-witted and street-savvy instead of passive princesses, and the Grimms promptly stripped that all away. 

"Grimms Bad Girls and Bold Boys" by Ruth Bottingheimer is an excellent book on this

We had to read The Book of Lost Things for school and it’s Grimm level crazy 

Not only that, you’re skipping out a really important thing: the brother’s grimm got those tales from WOMEN, women were the ones who would tell these tales orally and the brother’s grimm took them, altered them to be sexist and never gave the women credit. You can read Clever Maids the Secret History The Grimm Fairytales for more info

reblogging for the excellent commentary